Category Archives: Food Waste

A sustainable christmas meal

Christmas songs on the radio, shopping windows transformed into Christmas looks and you have already put the Christmas tree in your living room. Up next the dinner you have to prepare for your family and friends. How can you serve a meal, which is less harmful for the environment? The amounts of miles that a typical Christmas meal travels before it ends up on your plate can easily add up to 49,000 miles. However a green Christmas meal is possible!! Interested? Take a look at the tips below.

turkey-xmas460

1)   Buy local

Visit a farmers store, or a farmers market and collect your products there. These are more sustainable and probably only traveled for a couple of miles.

2)   Buy seasonal

A lot of products are not available in the winter, at least not from your own country. All of these products are imported from around the world. Imagine what carbon footprint they must have left behind, so not really environmental friendly right? Take a look at seasonal products. I am pretty sure you can make a fantastic meal with those products.

3)   Go organic

If you are against the intensive farming, then especially pay attention to this point. Food that has been produced organically less harmful pesticides have been used and this is of course a lot better for the environment. And a organic turkey did not have to suffer from the intensive farming.

4)   Go veggie

Are you still a bit sad about the turkey? Even though it comes from an organic farm. Then think about a vegetarian Christmas meal. With some good recipes and innovative thinking I bet you can surprise your entire family.

5)   Watch your waste

And last but not least watch your waste. And this does not start with the things you throw away, but already on your shopping list. Do you really need everything? Don’t you think you have way too much? Think critically and you will have to waste less food.

If we all took the above-mentioned points into consideration, even the smallest bits help. We can have another feeling as just fed up with all the food, but at least you have done something good for the environment this Christmas. Isn’t that what Christmas is about amongst other things, to take care of one another?

and as we would say in the Netherlands: EET SMAKELIJK!

Nicole

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Every student’s dream: Mould-free bread for 60 days

Don’t we all recognize the problem of buying bread and not being able to finish it before it gets mouldy?  As a student, I have this problem pretty often. The only solution is to keep it in the freezer and defrost a slice per time you need one. But what if your bread can stay mould-free for 60 days?! Isn’t that every student’s and single’s dream? Apart from saving money and not having to frost and defrost your bread everyday, mould-free bread would be the perfect solution  to a big part of customers’ food waste as 32% of loaves purchased in the UK thrown out as waste when they could be eaten, according to figures from the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs McGrath, M. (2012). Does this solution sound unrealistic to you? American company Microzap doesn’t think so.

Zapping the bread in a sophisticated microwave should do the trick. The company claims it could also be applied to turkey, vegetables and fruits. The laboratory is based on the campus of Texas Tech University in Lubbock. The machine that kills the mould spores has raised interest by many bread manufacturers, however the popularity among the average customer might be disappointing  It is expected that treating the loaves with this machine will increase the costs of bread and at the end of the day, it’s all about the money. Especially in regards to the average customer.

Chief executive Don Stull mentioned another worry, which is that customers might be hesitant with buying bread that will last for 60 days. “We’ll have to get some consumer acceptance of that,” he said. “Most people do it by feel and if you still have that quality feel they probably will accept it.”(Stull, D. 2012. cited by McGrath M.). A picture of the magical machine can be found in the slideshow below.

_64477956_img_4839Easter_Breaddiscarded-fresh-bread-006broodschimmel

Sources: fantom-xp, BBC &  dwotd

What do you think? Would you buy bread treated in a laboratory that will last for 60 days?

Source information, citations and picture: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-20540758 

Madelon

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Play with your food!

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We have already written a lot about food and visual arts. Even about the two combined already. But what about visual arts that is made of food? There are a lot of exhibitions and arts works in which artists use food as one or more materials. I came across some while searching on the internet and I find if quite interesting to see. Especially since there is a story behind it. Yes true, this is at almost every art work, but still it seems somewhat more interesting when food is involved to me.

These artists has taken their creativity to a yummy level!

There are even paintings that where all the materials used are made of food products. So has Carl Warner, a photographer based in London, made a so called foodscapes: landscapes made of food. In the picture below, a pea pod boat sails away from a land made of bread and potatoes, over a sea of salmon. Funny huh?!

Some artists are only using them since they do not see the point of wasting it. Which brings them back to our project. Others are doing it because they want to stand out from the crowd. The artists Zoe Leonard made ‘untitled’ are pieces, in which she ate the food products but only left the skin and used this skin to make an art work of it. Everybody is throwing them away, since it is not normal to eat, but she is showing them in another light.

“I was tired of wasting things, throwing things out all the time,” she says, as quoted in the sign listed next to her piece.

So do not listen to your mother and play with your food!

X Kim

Social Innovation Sessions with Network Opportunity

In the course of this project we have created a sort of scheme on how to bring the two worlds of visual culture and food together and came up with the idea of a creative workshop and network session. The workshops will take place next week and we have still spots available for the sessions on Thursday. If you would like to participate or know someone that would like to come, just sent us an email to bridge.researchagency@gmail.com.

The content of these sessions will be in Dutch. Here you can find the flyer and the program:

programma-22-november

Tomorrows blog will focus on the content and set up of the workshops, but if you have any questions before hand don’t hesitate to contact us.

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The Food Recovery Network

The past weeks I have been busy looking into inspiring projects and best practices for our project. During my search online I came across a project initiated by students that I found very inspiring. The dedication of the students and volunteers involved is heartwarming and therefore I decided to present it in todays post.

Basically the Food Recovery Network (FRN) is a project initiated by students of the University of Maryland in the United States. It is their mission to prevent food waste by collecting leftover food from college cafeterias and events and providing it to churches, homeless shelters and people in need. The initiative is completely run and initiated by volunteer students investing a vast amount of time in changing the world a little bit by creating social innovation. In my oppinion by supporting homeless people and other food banks and offering this service for free the students at the FRN have tackled one major problem in the food sector. By doing our research in the field it became obvious quite fast that food waste is a major issue. Several different projects have been launched all over the world, but I find this particular initiative very inspiring because it is lead by students that believe in something, have social courage and want to help changing things, a trait that is unfortunately rarely found in todays world.

Initiated by students at the University of Maryland in very short time the project has spread out all over the United States and been picked up by students at different colleges following one major aim, preventing food waste and feeding everyone in need. The fact that this project spread fast and the focus on sustainability shows that there is a critical need and primarly also interest by other people which helped the Food Recovery Network to gain attention during the past year. On their website the students invite off campus businesses to participate by explaining them the benefits of donating food leftovers and offering help for pickup and delivery of the food.

Here are two videos about the Food Recovery Network which are definitely worth checking out and you should also visit their website http://www.foodrecoverynetwork.org/

7 min coverage

Promotional Video


I hope you’ll be as inspired as I was. Enjoy! SH

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One Third

While conducting research for best practices that combine visual culture with our societal challenge which is food waste, I have come across this project by the Austrian photographer Klaus Pichler.

One Third is a project on food waste and is a series of rotten food still lifes. Pichler not only focuses on the individual wastage but also draws attention to globalized food production and waste. His work is inspired by a study about food waste published by the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations, which announced that one third of the world’s food supply end up as waste.

The series of photos show arrangements of decaying food as “classical still life” with a black background, enabling to rivet on the details of each rotten produce – be it pineapple, meat, watermelon or any other kind of perishable food. These still lifes are also accompanied by a profile, clarifying the place of production, cultivation method, transport distance and means of transportation as well as the carbon footprint.

This impressive project is a great example of combining visual culture and the social issue of food waste; it provokes a mixture of disgust, fascination and alarm – it definitely gained my attention and made me more aware of this societal challenge! It is simply amazing!

What do you think of this project?

 

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All pictures are taken from http://www.kpic.at

For more information about this project, please visit the following link:

http://www.kpic.at/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&layout=blog&id=45&Itemid=88

 

GZM

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